12 October 2009

Smokers’ exposures to cigarette tar and nicotine

 

Much greater than previously acknowledged by the manufacturer

 

 

 

Method

 

By previous studies using smoker-cued machine smoking to give total tar and nicotine inhaled, in combination with analysis of the amount retained in the filter, analysis in this study of the filter enabled estimation of amounts of nicotine and tar inhaled. The most proximal 1 cm of butt was analysed, between the mouth end and the filtration vents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference

D.C. Mariner, M. Ashley, G. Errington, G. Mullard, S.K. Prasad, J. Sheppard and C.J. Shepperd. Cross-sectional study of cigarette smoke exposure in eight countries. British American Tobacco, Group Research and Development, Southampton UK. Poster, SRNT meeting Dublin April 2009.

 

Results

 

 

NZ

Australia

N

391

704

% of market surveyed

52

41

Cigarettes per day

18.8

21.5

Tar /cigarette mg men

17.9

14.1

mg women

17.2

11.9

Nicotine/cigarette men

1.65

1.60

mg women

1.46

1.27

Tar per day mg

321

281

Nicotine per day mg

30.0

29.6

Comment:

 

Exposure to tar and nicotine is much higher in

reality than previously admitted by the

manufacturers or published by them on the packets.

Tar (the visible particulates or solids in smoke)

contains some toxicants causing cancer. Most of the

harm is from invisible gases in the smoke.

RYO brands were not included.

 

A law ending cigarette sales can save 4000 lives and $22 billion annually

 Dr Murray Laugesen QSO chair; Prof Ross McCormick, Sir John Scott KBE, Trish Fraser MPH, Dr Marewa Glover, Trustees

Making it easier to quit smoking for good 2009 End Smoking NZ